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Addendum on my accessibility advice, refining it based on feedback/questions 

After answering many questions on and used by , , , people, I think it would be good to summarise them in their refined forms in one spot for easy reference.
1. Writing well as a general advice stands, however, I wrote my post in English and naturally included some points specific to English. Screen readers are programmed to work best with languages according to their spelling conventions regarding capitalisation, punctuation, and symbol usage; covering anything from casual to academic writing styles. Substituting letters with symbols/numbers falls outside of such conventions, meaning words will not read correctly.
2. , and the time it takes to write them, is very much appreciated, regardless of length or level of detail. However, the more detail you can put in the more we can appreciate the image and your reasons for sharing it.
3. Multi-word hashtags in CamelCase, yes: . It does not matter where you place them; either in the post's text or at the end. The best analogy for screen reader users being able to deal with hashtags in text is that we've become used to them in the same way we're used to people saying "uh", "ummm", or other extraneous vocalisations when talking.
Bonus: By all means, use emojis for that extra bit of expression, but in moderation.
Final thoughts: Screen readers can be customised by the user to make it work best for them, including minimising any annoyances. The above points will help loads regarding shared content. Assume that a screen reader user has optimised their settings to deal with the rest.
Once again, thanks for reading! 😘

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long post on accessibility advice from a blind screen reader user 

OK . I've seen several toots on for users, however, I've not seen one from a screenreader user (as far as I know). I've used ZoomText, Outspoken, JAWS (AKA JFW), Supernova, NVDA (Windows), and VoiceOver (both on Macs and iPhone). I don't have experience with Windows Narrator or TalkBack. I would like to rectify and clarify a few small things.
First off, any awareness of accessibility issues, and endeavours to make things more accessible is great. Keep going!
But…
Blind/low-vision people have been using the internet as long as everyone else. We had to become used to the way people share things, and find workarounds or tell developers what we needed; this latter one has been the main drive to get us here and now. Over the past decade, screen readers have improved dramatically, including more tools, languages, and customisability. However, the basics were already firmly in place around 2000. Sadly, screen readers cost a lot of money at that time. Now, many are free; truly the biggest triumph for accessibility IMHO.
So, what you can do to help screen readers help their users is three simple things.
1. Write well: use punctuation, and avoid things like random capitalisation or * halfway through words.
2. Image description: screen readers with image recognition built-in will only provide a very short description, like: a plant, a painting, a person wearing a hat, etc. It can also deal with text included in the image, as long as the text isn't too creatively presented. So, by all means, go absolutely nuts with detail.
3. Hashtags: this is the most commonly boosted topic I've seen here, so . The capitalisation ensures it's read correctly, and for some long hashtags without caps, I've known screen readers to give up and just start spelling the whole damn thing out, which is slow and painful.
That's really all. Thanks for reading! 😘

Ah, haven't gotten around to my music share from Indonesia yet, so hopefully later this evening or tomorrow. On a related topic, I'm currently making ayam pangang. Yum!

Seems the Earth is pretty active lately; Crete, Turkey, Java, and now an erupting Mauna Loa on Hawaii. The last time it erupted, and due to the steep slopes of the tallest active volcano on Earth, lava reached the sea—a distance of 24 km—in 3 hours. Stuff that's 800-1200 degrees Celsius and rushing downhill at 8 km/h sounds like a nightmare. Of course, for me half a world away it's all fascinating and academic. Stay safe, people.

You definitely won't see many from me, especially about , but well, I did promise. So, this is primarily aimed at people at the female-expressing end of the gender spectrum.
This is a small business (pretty much just 1 person, I think) from Cornwall that makes some lovely along , , / , , angles. Plus, I should include too as they have some and (the BBC series with Colin Morgan) inspired things, among others. Plus, it's all hand-made, made-to-measure, and customisable or commissionable. Have a look:
moonmaiden-gothic-clothing.co.

It seems my notifications feed had the equivalent of a sneeze that just wouldn't happen. No wonder I thought it was quiet yesterday, but umm, no, just Mastodon doing Mastodon processing things. 🦣📈⏳

share from a random country:
🇨🇬
The Republic of the , also Congo-Brazzaville, was under French colonial rule until its independence in 1960, but the republic had been established two years prior. It is sometimes very hard to keep the two Congos apart; both became independent in 1960 (one from France, the other from Belgium), and then things got politically rather turbulent, however, the DRC was much worse off than its northern counterpart, leading eventually to the 1st and 2nd Congo wars during the 90s-00s, and costing millions of lives. But I'm getting side-tracked from Congo-Brazzaville here; a great example of how the DRC tends to dominate any conversation about the region.
Yesterday I mentioned how the word "jazz" is used in an African context, well, that same thing applies here again. However, in the Republic of the congo, the musical mixing had a different permutation from Guinea. There's much more and influence present in what later became , but both Congolese capitals, Brazzaville and Kinshasa, which face each other across the mighty Congo river, contributed to the overall sound of this very popular genre.
This is Batoboli by Ry-co Jazz and Soukous Stars. It's very danceable, and the bass lines are definitely dancing and driving. Plus hey, we also get a lovely solo.
youtube.com/watch?v=XbmHQO7_3z
For the next random country we're skipping across the Indian Ocean to 🇮🇩

, well, series really, that I keep going back to, so these must tell you something about me. In no particular order:
Discworld - Terry Pratchett
The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
The Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien
The StormLight Archives - Brandon Sanderson
The Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
Winter - Alex Callister
Bit surprised the last one made the list, but sometimes you need a kick-ass female protagonist really.

I sometimes like to check out , just to relax to, to experience a different place for a while, or to examine it for its sonic character and currents. This one is of obviously-not-sleeping-at-night during a short rain shower and some thunder. It have video as well, recorded on the 27th floor, while the audio was captured on the 15th. Aside from the rain and thunder, there are sirens, traffic noises including horns, people talking, random bangs and thuds, etc. Ha! Maybe it could be ! Definitely listen with headphones.
youtube.com/watch?v=DRbRIXMmHt

share from a random country:
🇬🇳
After Guinea's independence in 1958, the government purchased instrument's such as electric and bass guitars, keyboards, trumpets, saxophones, etc. for the state-sponsored dance bands that were tasked to embrace Guinea's musical heritage, but also modernise it for the new post-colonial era.
This is Waraba (lion) by Bembeya Jazz National. They are one of the most famous dance bands from Guinea. They don't really play jazz, as their name suggests, but in an African context this just means new modern music fusing many elements, which does include jazz.
Anytime I listen to Bembeya Jazz I'm particularly struck by the skills of their guitarist, Sekou "diamond fingers" Diabaté, whose tonal clarity and innovative percussive melodic playing is quite something; so keep an ear out for it.
youtube.com/watch?v=sPz0WJNm9d
For the next random country we're apparently staying in Africa, but moving east towards 🇨🇬, more specifically the Republic of the Congo, which should not be confused with its neighbour the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Yesterday I shared the above song called "Duncan" by Slim Dusty, about whom I said I had never heard despite his many accolades. That's still true, but I think I may have heard one of his recordings years ago in a documentary about the of . That song is called "Waltzing Matilda"; no not the Tom Waits one, which is called "Tom Traubert's blues" anyway. The name refers to travelling on foot with one's belongings in a Matilda on one's back. Regardless, I can't be sure this is the version I heard, but it sounds close to what I remember.
The song was written in 1894 by Banjo Paterson and talks about a swagman (itinerant worker)making a drink of billy tea at a bush camp and capturing a stray jumbuck (sheep) to eat. Then, when the jumbuck's owner, a squatter (grazier), and three troopers (mounted policemen) pursue the swagman for theft, he drowns himself in a nearby billabong (watering hole), after which his ghost haunts the site.
Here's the song:
youtube.com/watch?v=kZBIqeRSKo

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Addendum on my accessibility advice, refining it based on feedback/questions 

After answering many questions on and used by , , , people, I think it would be good to summarise them in their refined forms in one spot for easy reference.
1. Writing well as a general advice stands, however, I wrote my post in English and naturally included some points specific to English. Screen readers are programmed to work best with languages according to their spelling conventions regarding capitalisation, punctuation, and symbol usage; covering anything from casual to academic writing styles. Substituting letters with symbols/numbers falls outside of such conventions, meaning words will not read correctly.
2. , and the time it takes to write them, is very much appreciated, regardless of length or level of detail. However, the more detail you can put in the more we can appreciate the image and your reasons for sharing it.
3. Multi-word hashtags in CamelCase, yes: . It does not matter where you place them; either in the post's text or at the end. The best analogy for screen reader users being able to deal with hashtags in text is that we've become used to them in the same way we're used to people saying "uh", "ummm", or other extraneous vocalisations when talking.
Bonus: By all means, use emojis for that extra bit of expression, but in moderation.
Final thoughts: Screen readers can be customised by the user to make it work best for them, including minimising any annoyances. The above points will help loads regarding shared content. Assume that a screen reader user has optimised their settings to deal with the rest.
Once again, thanks for reading! 😘

Show thread

The problem with interesting hashtags is that I've just seen Black Friday deals on pizza, and then thinking: hmm, it could be pizza .

Cassana boosted

Boost this fox to teleport him across the Fediverse and brighten someone's day! :blobfox:

Let's see how many instances the fox can reach on his journey!

Music share: Australia; country music about beer (but in moderation) 🫢 

share from a random country:
🇦🇺
I didn't really get around to this one the other day, but OK. I've heard that is pretty popular Down Under, but I don't know anything about it. I should also add that I'm absolutely not exposed much to country music at all.
This one caught my interest, because WHAT!? A country song that talks about drinking in moderation? Honestly, that seems rather novel to me. Then again, one of the last country things I was sent was a video of Hank Williams JR performing while roaring drunk. This, on the other hand, seems completely happy "just havin' a beer with me mates" and all that, umm, country.
Anyway, this is "Duncan" by Slim Dusty, who was apparently an Australian cultural icon with a career spanning 70 years, recorded 100+ albums and received 70 gold and platinum certifications. That's one veritable slew of accolades.
And I feel truly ignorant now, because… never heard of the guy. 🙈
youtube.com/watch?v=hOML9zwoZn
the next random country is: 🇬🇳, just Guinea, not Equatorial or Papua New.

I must admit I'm pretty fascinated by the way my accessibility post is still ticking over and has actually sped up a bit in terms of favourites and boost, after a time when it had really slowed down. I did study some IT, and got thoroughly bored with it, but if I had gone further into computer science I might have written something based on this with an evocatively wordy title like: "The propagation of content in a non-algorithm social media environment" (I won't copyright that, so steal it if you want). I'll just stick with my non-computer science reaction of: "That's interesting!"

I had a great time studying in the UK, so today I'm especially thinking of some of the great lecturers I've had, but also librarians and researchers I've interacted and worked with, who are striking, again, because you should be heard, and deserve so much better.

Cassana boosted

There's nowt new in archaeological woowoo.

Well worth watching these BBC Horizon programmes from 1999 & 2000 which shredded the same nonsense!!!

https://dai.ly/x223jd8
https://dai.ly/x33mfs5

#Archaeology #AncientApocalypse #WooWoo

Well, it seems like Spontianus was probably an actual person and a self-identified local emperor at that. The critique of it being circular logic: "coins proving a person exists because he minted the coins" is fair, but calling it "full fantasy" is IMHO a bit unfair. The evidence of the coins being genuine seems solid, and not criticised, and being worth a modern equivalent of $20,000 is nothing to sneeze at, in any time period. But, I'm not an expert. Any thoughts on this from much more learned / / (not sure which hashtag is used at the moment). theguardian.com/science/2022/n

Well, at least I won't have any problems with vampires tonight. 🤣 While cooking, a jar slipped out of my hand, snapped open on the first bounce, and then happily bounced out of the kitchen and across the hallway; leaving a narrow garlic powder trail of about 3 metres. Although I cleared it up now, I expect the smell will linger a bit. 🧄

Since I've been sharing and stuff today, have a about my favourite molecular cloud out there near the galactic centre. 😊
Raspberry rum cloud
Though the cyanide won't do
SGR B2

More interesting news, again from the James . This time no awesome images with evocative alt text, but nothing less than signs for active and clouds in thee atmosphere of an exoplanet, namely the memorably named (not!) WASp39B.
webbtelescope.org/contents/new
Is this another one for comparative planetary meteorology? 🪐🌥️

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